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RubyKaigi 2008 News: 1.9.1 In December, Ruby Heading For ISO Standardization

By Peter Cooper / July 7, 2008

rubykaigi08.png
(Credit: june29 - photo under CC 2.0 Attribution license)

RubyKaigi 2008 took place a couple of weeks ago. As the main Japanese Ruby conference, RubyKaigi is the de-facto authoritative Ruby conference, and the news that came out of the conference this year did little to shake its stature.

The online enterprise news publication InfoQ has covered the conference in two parts. The first features a mini interview with Matz, where he talks about the low adoption rate of Ruby in the enterprise and the role of certifications in the Ruby world. The second InfoQ post reveals that Matz is preparing to "standardize" Ruby, with the ultimate aim to submit a Ruby standard to the ISO, and Koichi Sasada reveals that Ruby 1.9.1 (notable, as it will be the first officially stable / production-ready release of Ruby 1.9) is set to arrive this December.

A lot more seems to have gone down at RubyKaigi than this, as evidenced by the absolute snowstorm of links tagged rubykaigi on del.icio.us, though most of the evidence is in Japanese, of course.

Comments

  1. gaiusparx says:

    Anyone knows if an ISO standard Ruby a good or bad thing for the programming language? Thanks

  2. Peter Cooper says:

    There has been a tendency to stick to standards and not produce proprietary add-ons to the language in the Ruby community anyway.

    ECMAScript (the "parent" of JavaScript, in many ways) and C# are both ISO standards and this hasn't appeared to hinder their takeup. Indeed, the ISO standard on C# has helped a lot of open source developers to work on their own implementations.

  3. jennyw says:

    And that means that there will be an official specification for Ruby! That should make work easier for alternative Ruby implementations (and RubySpec).

  4. Charles L says:

    I think its a great thing as far as language maturity and stability goes.

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